Diabetes Complications and Amputation Prevention

Diabetes Complications and Amputation Prevention

People living with diabetes are prone to having foot problems, often because of two complications of diabetes: nerve damage (neuropathy) and poor circulation. Neuropathy causes loss of feeling in your feet, taking away your ability to feel pain and discomfort, so you may not detect an injury or irritation. Poor circulation in your feet reduces your ability to heal, making it hard for even a tiny cut to resist infection.

Having diabetes increases the risk of developing a wide range of foot problems. Furthermore, with diabetes, small foot problems can turn into serious complications.

Diabetes-Related Foot & Leg Problems

What Your Foot & Ankle Surgeon Can Do

Your foot and ankle surgeon can help wounds heal, preventing amputation. Many new surgical techniques are available to save feet and legs, including joint reconstruction and wound healing technologies. Getting regular foot checkups and seeking immediate help when you notice something can keep small problems from worsening. Your foot and ankle surgeon works together with other healthcare providers to prevent and treat complications from diabetes.

Your Proactive Measures

You play a vital role in reducing complications. Follow these guidelines and contact your foot and ankle surgeon if you notice any problems:

When Is Amputation Necessary?

Even with preventive care and prompt treatment of infection and complications, there are instances when amputation is necessary to remove infected tissue, save a limb or even save a life.

Author
foothealthfacts.org

You Might Also Enjoy...

Acute Inflammation

What Is Acute Inflammation? Inflammation is the body’s normal protective response to an injury, irritation or surgery. This natural defense process brings increased blood flow to the area, resulting in an accumulation of fluid.

Calcaneal Apophysitis

Calcaneal Apophysitis (Sever's Disease) What Is Calcaneal Apophysitis? Calcaneal apophysitis is a painful inflammation of the heel’s growth plate. It typically affects children between the ages of 8 and 14 years old.