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Experiencing

an Ankle Sprain?

Sprained ankles are very common and can happen to anyone. However, while you may think you can nurse your sprained ankle at home, if not properly managed, your sprained ankle can turn into future ankle issues. The foot and ankle experts at Nashville Podiatry  can provide you with the care you need to heal your sprained ankle so you can get back to the things you love. For an evaluation, call the office today or book an appointment online.

About Ankle Sprains

Bunions are a progressive foot deformity and don’t always improve with time and patience. If you have a bunion, the experienced team at Nashville Podiatry can provide the care you need to reduce your symptoms, prevent progression of the deformity, and correct it when necessary. To schedule a bunion consultation, call the office today or book an appointment online.

Ankle Sprains Q & A

What causes a sprained ankle?​

Sprained ankles often result from a fall, a sudden twist, or a blow that forces the ankle joint out of its normal position. Ankle sprains commonly occur while participating in sports, wearing inappropriate shoes, or walking or running on an uneven surface. Sometimes ankle sprains occur because of weak ankles, a condition

that some people are born with. Previous ankle or foot injuries can also weaken the ankle and lead to sprains.

What are the signs and symptoms of a sprained ankle?​

The signs and symptoms of ankle sprains may include:

  • Pain or soreness

  • Swelling

  • Bruising

  • Difficulty walking

  • Stiffness in the joint

These symptoms may vary in intensity, depending on the severity of the sprain. Sometimes pain and swelling are absent in people with previous ankle sprains—instead, they may simply feel the ankle is wobbly and unsteady when they walk. Even if you don’t have pain or swelling with a sprained ankle, treatment is crucial. Any ankle sprain—whether it’s your first or your fifth—requires prompt medical attention. If you think you’ve sprained your ankle, contact your foot and ankle surgeon for an appointment as soon as possible. In the meantime, immediately begin using the “R.I.C.E.” method—Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation—to help reduce swelling, pain, and further injury.

Why is prompt medical attention needed?​

There are four key reasons why an ankle sprain should be promptly evaluated and treated by a foot and ankle surgeon:

  • First, an untreated ankle sprain may lead to chronic ankle instability, a condition marked by persistent discomfort and a “giving way” of the ankle.You may also develop weakness in the leg.

  • Second, you may have suffered a more severe ankle injury along with the sprain. This might include a serious bone fracture that could lead to troubling complications if it goes untreated.

  • Third, an ankle sprain may be accompanied by a foot injury that causes discomfort but has gone unnoticed thus far.

  • Fourth, rehabilitation of a sprained ankle needs to begin right away. If rehabilitation is delayed, the injury may be less likely to heal properly. In evaluating your injury, the foot and ankle surgeon will take your history to learn more about the injury. He or she will examine the injured area, and may order x-rays, an MRI study, or a CT scan to help determine the severity of the injury.

What are the non-surgical treatment and rehabilitation options?​

When you have an ankle sprain, rehabilitation is crucial—and it starts the moment your treatment begins. Your foot and ankle surgeon may recommend one or more of the

following treatment options:

  • Immobilization. Depending on the severity of your injury, you may receive a short-leg cast, a walking boot, or a brace to keep your ankle from moving. You may also need crutches.

  • Early physical therapy. Your doctor will start you on a rehabilitation program as soon as possible to promote healing and increase your range of motion. This includes doing prescribed exercises.

  • Medications. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, may be recommended to reduce pain and inflammation. In some cases, prescription pain medications are needed to provide adequate relief.

  • Icing. You may be advised to ice your injury several times a day until the pain and swelling resolves. Wrap ice cubes, or a bag of frozen peas or corn, in a thin towel. Do not put ice directly on your skin.

  • Compression wraps. To prevent further swelling, you may need to keep your ankle wrapped in an elastic bandage or stocking.

 

When is surgery needed?​

In more severe cases, surgery may be required to adequately treat an ankle sprain. Surgery often involves repairing the damaged ligament or ligaments. The foot and ankle surgeon will select the surgical procedure best suited for your case based on the type and severity of your injury as well as your activity level. After surgery, rehabilitation is extremely important. Completing your rehabilitation program is crucial to a successful outcome. Be sure to continue to see your foot and ankle surgeon during this period to ensure that your ankle heals properly and function is restored.

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NASHVILLE

3443 Dickerson Pike
Suite 500

Nashville, TN 37207

Fax (615) 860-8258

Tuesday 8am - 5pm

Friday 8am - 3pm

HENDERSONVILLE

353 New Shackle Island Rd
Suite 203A

Hendersonville, TN 37075

Fax (615) 822-9655

Monday 8am - 5pm

Tuesday 8am - 5pm

Thursday 8am - 5pm

GALLATIN

336 Sumner Hall Drive

Gallatin, TN 37066

Fax (615) 452-8919

Monday 8am - 5pm

Wednesday 8am - 5pm

Thursday 8am - 5pm

Friday 8am - 5pm

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