Aerobics

Welcome! Since 1994, Nashville Podiatry has been working with patients to provide the best podiatric care for patients in the North Nashville area. Dr. Daniel Mendoza's experience in podiatry is coupled with genuine concern for his patients. All our staff is dedicated to your comfort and prompt attention as well. Our goal is to help you maintain healthy feet.

This web site provides you with an overview of our practice and the field of podiatry. As you navigate the site, you'll find information about Dr Mendoza's practice philosophy, our office locations, insurance policies, and appointment scheduling procedures. Please browse the site at your convenience and feel free to contact us with any questions. You can also request an appointment by clicking here.

You'll find a lot of valuable information on the web site about foot problems, diagnoses and treatments. We believe informed patients are better prepared to make decisions about their health and well being. We encourage you to review this information to help you understand any health concerns you may face.

What is a Podiatrist?

A podiatrist, also called a doctor of podiatric medicine, is a specialist who provides medical diagnosis and treatment of foot and ankle problems, such as bunions, heel pain, spurs, hammertoes, neuromas, ingrown toenails, warts, corns and calluses. A podiatrist also renders care of sprains, fractures, infections, and injuries of the foot, ankle and heel. In addition to undergraduate medical school training, podiatrists also attend graduate school for a doctorate degree in podiatry. Podiatrists are required to take state and national exams, as well as be licensed by the state in which they practice.

According to the American Podiatric Medical Association, there are an estimated 15,000 practicing podiatrists in the United States. Podiatrists are in demand more than ever today because of a rapidly aging population. In addition, according to the association, foot disorders are among the most widespread and neglected health problems affecting people in this country.

Typically, podiatrists:

  • Consult with patients and other physicians on how to prevent foot problems.
  • Diagnose and treat tumors, ulcers, fractures, skin and nail diseases, vascular problems and deformities.
  • Perform surgeries to correct or remedy such problems as bunions, clawtoes, fractures, hammertoes, infections, ruptured Achilles, and other ligaments and tendons.
  • Prescribe therapies and perform diagnostic procedures such as x-rays, MRI, CAT scans, ultrasound and lab tests.
  • Prescribes or fits patients with inserts called orthotics that correct walking patterns.
  • Treat conditions such as: bone disorders, bunions, corns, calluses, cysts, heel spurs, infections, ingrown nails, and plantar fasciitis.

More than 24 million people participate in some kind of aerobic exercise, which offers a host of health benefits, including increased cardiopulmonary efficiency, strengthened heart and lungs, improved circulation, lowered cholesterol levels, and stress and anxiety reduction.

Because aerobic exercise involves quick lateral movements, jumping, and leaping for extended periods of time, proper foot care plays a vital part in keeping the entire body fit. Common injuries from aerobics often involve the foot, ankle, and lower leg. Improper shoes, surfaces, or routines, and straining muscles by too vigorous a routine can lead to foot problems. Experts say that hardwood floors, especially with padded mats, are the best surfaces for your feet during aerobic exercise. And don't forget to stretch all the muscles, tendons, and ligaments in the leg, ankle, foot, and toes in a warm-up and cool-down periods before and after aerobics.

 

Aerobic Shoes

Proper shoes are crucial to successful, injury-free aerobics. Old sneakers in your closet are not the proper shoes for aerobics. Major shoe companies today have designed special shoes for aerobics, which provide the necessary arch and side support; they also have soles that allow for the twisting and turning of an aerobics regimen. Be aware that running shoes lack the necessary lateral stability and lift the heel too high to support aerobic activity. They also often have an acute outside flare that may put the athlete at greater risk of injury from the side-by-side motion in aerobics.

Aerobic shoes should provide sufficient cushioning and shock absorption to compensate for pressure on the foot many times greater than found in walking. They must also have good medial-lateral stability. Impact forces from aerobics can reach up to six times the force of gravity, which is transmitted to each of the 26 bones in the foot.

Because of the many side-to-side motions, aerobic shoes need an arch design that will compensate for these forces. Look for shoes with sufficiently thick upper leather or strap support to provide forefoot stability and prevent slippage of the foot and lateral shoe "breakup." Make sure shoes have a toe box that is high enough to prevent irritation of your toes and nails.

Two other tips: buy your aerobics shoes in the afternoon, when your feet swell slightly and wear the same socks (preferably made of an acrylic blend) that you will wear during aerobics.