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Posts for: August, 2016

By contactus@nashvillepodiatry.com
August 30, 2016
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Cavus foot is a condition in which the foot has a very high arch. Because of this high arch, an excessive amount of weight is placed on the ball and heel of the foot. This condition can lead to a variety of symptoms such as instability of the foot, calluses on the ball and heel of the foot, hammertoes, pain in the ball of the foot, pain in the bottom of the heel, and Achilles pain. Cavus foot can be caused by an inherited abnormality or medical condition such as cerebral palsy, spina bifida, polio, muscular dystrophy, or stroke.

 

Callous trimming may alleviate the pain, custom orthotic devices may be beneficial by providing stability to the foot, or surgery may be needed if Achilles pain begins to limit your everyday activities.

Call 615-452-8899 or click here to schedule your appointment at Nashville Podiatry today!


By contactus@nashvillepodiatry.com
August 23, 2016
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Hallux rigidus is a disorder of the joint located at the base of the big toe – different than bunions and sesamoiditis. It causes pain and stiffness in the big toe, and with time it gets increasingly harder to bend the toe. Hallux rigidus is actually a form of degenerative arthritis where the cartilage within the joint slowly becomes worn out. Because hallux rigidus is a progressive condition, the toe’s motion decreases as time goes on. In its earlier stage, motion of the big toe is only somewhat limited – at this point it is called “hallux limitus”. As the problem advances, the toe’s range of motion gradually decreases until it potentially becomes stiff – called “hallux rigidus” or a “frozen joint”.

 

Common causes of hallux rigidus are faulty biomechanics and structural abnormalities of the foot that can lead to osteoarthritis in the big toe joint. For example, those with fallen arches or excessive pronation (rolling in) of the ankles are susceptible to developing hallux rigidus. In some people, hallux rigidus runs in the family and is a result of inheriting a foot type that is prone to developing this condition. In other cases, it is associated with overuse – especially among people engaged in activities or jobs that increase the stress on the big toe, such as workers who often have to stoop or squat. Hallux rigidus can also result from an injury – even from stubbing your toe. Or it may be caused by certain inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or gout. There are various conservative treatment options, and surgery is a last resort.

Click here or call Nashville Podiatry at 615-452-8899 to schedule your appointment today!


By contactus@nashvillepodiatry.com
August 18, 2016
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Extracorporeal Pulse Activation Technology (EPAT) is a non-invasive procedure that utilizes acoustic energy and is designed to enhance blood circulation and accelerate the healing process. It improves the regenerative potential rather than further damaging an area that has degenerated because of poor blood flow, tissue injury, overuse or weakness. It is often used to treat plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendonitis non-invasively, with no anesthesia and with minimal risks or side effects.

 

Coupling gel is applied to the specified treatment area and EPAT pressure waves are released via the applicator. Treatment sessions take about 10 minutes, and generally 3 to 5 treatment sessions are necessary at weekly intervals. Occasionally, patients experience some minor discomfort for a few days following the procedure. Some patients report immediate pain relief and others begin to notice after a few weeks. There is no risk of infection, no scarring, and no downtime.

If you are interested in receiving the EPAT procedure click here or call our office at 615-860-8282 to schedule your appointment today!


By contactus@nashvillepodiatry.com
August 11, 2016
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Pre-dislocation syndrome of the second digit, also known as “crossover toe”, is a condition in which the second toe drifts toward the big toe and eventually crosses over and lies on top of the big toe. It is a progressive disorder that can begin at any age, but is most often seen in adults.

Although the crossing over of the toe usually occurs over a period of time, it can appear more quickly if caused by injury. Symptoms include: pain in the ball of the foot, or feeling like there is a marble in the shoe or a sock is bunched up. There can be swelling at the base of the second toe, and some may have difficulty wearing certain shoes.

 

Crossover toe is a result of abnormal foot mechanics, where the ball of the foot beneath the second toe joint takes an excessive amount of weight-bearing. This pressure eventually leads to weakening of the supportive ligaments and a failure of the joint to stabilize the toe, resulting in the toe crossing over. Certain foot abnormalities can make a person prone to experiencing excessive pressure on the ball of the foot, including: a severe bunion deformity, a second toe longer than the big toe, and an arch that is structurally unstable.

This condition is sometimes misdiagnosed, especially in the early stages when there is pain but the toe has not yet crossed over. The pain experienced mimics a Morton’s neuroma, but the two disorders are treated very differently – making it crucial to obtain an accurate diagnosis. Rest, ice, and oral anti-inflammatories may help relieve pain and inflammation. Immobilization, taping, or splinting may be necessary to prevent further drifting of the toe. Custom orthotics help stabilize the arch, and adding a metatarsal pad helps distribute the weight away from the joint. Surgical correction is an option if the deformity becomes severe and conservative treatments are not working.

Click here or call our office at 615-452-8899 to schedule your appointment today!


By contactus@nashvillepodiatry.com
August 01, 2016
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We would like to take the opportunity to thank you for your support of Nashville Podiatry (Dr. Daniel Mendoza) over the years. We are excited to introduce to you a new associate joining the practice, Dr. Elizabeth Wakefield.

Elizabeth Wakefield, DPM, was born and raised in the greater Cleveland, Ohio area. Growing up, she loved to spend time performing choreographed dance, marching/jazz/concert band, horseback riding, church youth conventions, and building houses with Habitat for Humanity. She graduated Cum Laude from North Royalton High School in 2005. She enjoyed four years at The College of Wooster, where she graduated in 2009 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. She also received honors for her independent study thesis for original research in the area of diabetes and glycemic control. In 2013 she graduated from Kent State University, College of Podiatric Medicine where she earned her Doctorate in Podiatric Medicine. She moved to Columbus, Ohio, to complete a three-year podiatric medicine and surgical residency, with reconstructive rearfoot and ankle surgery, completed in 2016 at Grant Medical Center.

Family and community are the center of Elizabeth's life. She married her high school sweetheart, Nathan, in 2010. They have a rescued black and white cat, who has a ton of personality and attitude. Her hobbies include crafting and counted cross stitch, training for her first half marathon, and hiking and camping in the great outdoors.

Dr. Wakefield has begun seeing patients in our Gallatin office and at our Skyline Medical Plaza location! Click here or call our office at 615-452-8899 to schedule your appointment today!