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Posts for: July, 2016

By contactus@nashvillepodiatry.com
July 25, 2016
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Diabetic neuropathy is nerve damage caused by diabetes. The type of neuropathy occurring in the arms, hands, legs, and feet is known as diabetic peripheral neuropathy. It usually develops slowly and worsens over time; some patients have this condition long before they are diagnosed with diabetes. Having diabetes for several years may increase the likelihood of having diabetic neuropathy.

The loss of sensation makes a patient prone to developing skin ulcers that can become infected and may not heal. This serious complication of diabetes can lead to loss of a foot or even a leg. Signs and symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy include: numbness, burning, tingling, or pain in the feet. Not only is it unpleasant, but because of the numbness a patient may not realize that they have stepped on a small object and cut the skin or have developed an ulcer.

First and foremost, treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy centers on control of the patient’s blood sugar level. Medications and specific vitamins are also available to help relieve some of the symptoms. 

Call our office at 615-452-8899 or click here to schedule your appointment with Dr. Mendoza today!


By contactus@nashvillepodiatry.com
July 12, 2016
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Chronic ankle instability is a condition characterized by a recurring “giving way” of the outer side of the ankle. This condition often develops after repeated ankle sprains. Usually the “giving way” occurs while walking or doing other activities, but it can also happen when you’re just standing.

 

Chronic ankle instability usually develops following an ankle sprain that has not adequately healed or was not rehabilitated completely. When you sprain your ankle, the connective tissues (such as the peroneal tendons) are stretched or torn, and the ability to balance is often affected. Proper rehabilitation is needed to strengthen the muscles around the ankle and “retrain” the tissues within the ankle that affect balance. Repeated ankle sprains often cause – and perpetuate – chronic ankle instability. Having an ankle that gives way increases your chances of spraining your ankle repeatedly. Each subsequent sprain leads to further weakening of the ligaments – resulting in greater instability and the likelihood of developing additional problems in the ankle.

If your ankle feels wobbly or unstable and gives way repeatedly, or if you’ve had recurring ankle sprains, see Dr. Mendoza to have your condition evaluated and treated. Chronic ankle instability that is left untreated leads to continued instability, activity limitations, arthritis, and tendonitis. Dr. Mendoza may recommend physical therapy, bracing, anti-inflammatory medications, and as a last resort surgery to repair or reconstruct the damaged soft tissue.

Click here or call our office at 615-452-8899 to schedule your appointment with Dr. Mendoza!


By contactus@nashvillepodiatry.com
July 05, 2016
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Haglund’s Deformity is a bony enlargement on the back of the heel that often leads to painful bursitis, which is inflammation of the fluid-filled sac (bursa) between the tendon and bone. In Haglund’s deformity, the soft tissue near the Achilles tendon becomes irritated when the bony enlargement rubs against shoes. The deformity is most common in young women who wear pumps – it is often called the “pump bump” because the rigid backs of pump-style shoes can create pressure that aggravates the enlargement when walking.

                          

To some extent, heredity can play a role in Haglund’s deformity. In a person with high arches, the heel bone is tilted backward into the Achilles tendon causing the uppermost portion of the back of the heel bone to rub against the tendon. Having a tight Achilles tendon can also be a contributing factor – pain can be caused by compression of the tender and inflamed bursa. Another possible contributor to Haglund’s deformity is a tendency to walk on the outside of the heel resulting in a grinding of the heel bone against the tendon.

Anti-inflammatories, icing, heel lifts, heel pads, and immobilization may be used to alleviate the pain – and surgery as a last resort. After evaluating the structure of your heel bone through x-rays and examination, Dr. Mendoza will develop the best treatment plan for you. Click here or call our office at 615-452-8899 to schedule your appointment today!