My Blog

Posts for: September, 2015

By contactus@nashvillepodiatry.com
September 28, 2015
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If you’ve ever had gout before you know that it can be extremely painful – even arising overnight.  Gout is a disorder caused by the build-up of uric acid, most often in the joint of the big toe. Because uric acid is sensitive to temperature changes it is more likely to crystallize in the joint of the big toe because it is the coolest part of the body. Uric acid is present in the blood and is eliminated in the urine.  It is the result of the breakdown of purines – foods with high levels of purines include red meat, red wine, and beer. Watching your diet to avoid these foods can help control your gout attacks.

  

In addition to being inherited, there are other factors that put a person at risk for developing gout: high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, water pills, and simply being a man aged 40 to 60. It is important for Dr. Mendoza to look at your x-rays and personal and family history to determine if the inflammation is caused by something other than gout. Depending on the severity of your gout attack, he may write you a prescription medication or give you an injection to help relieve the pain.

Click here or call our office at 615-452-8899 to schedule your appointment with Dr. Mendoza today!


By contactus@nashvillepodiatry.com
September 24, 2015
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The Achilles tendon is the band of tissue that connects the calf muscle to the heel bone.  It facilitates walking by helping to raise the heel off the ground.  As an overuse disorder, the tendonitis can be caused by a sudden increase of a repetitive activity involving the tendon. Athletes as well as “weekend warriors” are at a high risk for developing disorders of the Achilles.  Additionally, people with excessively high arches or flat feet have a tendency to develop Achilles tendonitis due to the greater demands placed on the tendon when walking – especially if they wear shoes without adequate stability. 

Dr. Mendoza can determine the extent of the condition with x-rays, ultrasound, or an MRI, and will develop the best treatment plan for you based on the degree of damage to the tendon.  Surgical repair is only necessary when the tendon has ruptured, but is a last resort when an injection, immobilization, icing, oral anti-inflammatory medications, and physical therapy fail to be effective.

Click here or call our office at 615-452-8899 to schedule your appointment with Dr. Mendoza today!


By contactus@nashvillepodiatry.com
September 14, 2015
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Does your child complain of pain in the heels? Calcaneal Apophysitis may be their problem!

A common childhood complaint can be pain in the back or bottom of the heel, and it usually affects eight to fourteen year olds.  As opposed to plantar fasciitis, pediatric heel pain usually is not most painful in the mornings, and walking and running typically make the pain worse.  The most common cause is calcaneal apophysitis which is inflammation of the heel’s growth plate – it can occur in one or both feet.  The inflammation can be caused by muscle strain and repetitive stress from physical activity.  It is important to see your podiatrist to make sure the pain is not caused by a stress fracture.

Treatment of pediatric heel pain depends on the diagnosis and severity of the pain.  For mild cases, a reduction in activity or cushion in the heel will be all that is needed.  Custom orthotics may be recommended to help properly support the foot as well.  It is advised to choose well-constructed and supportive shoes to help prevent pediatric heel pain.

Click here or call our office at 615-452-8899 to schedule an appointment with Dr. Mendoza!


By contactus@nashvillepodiatry.com
September 11, 2015
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Do you have pain associated with the base of your big toe but don’t think it is a bunion deformity? Sesamoiditis may be your problem!

The sesamoids are two pea-shaped bones located in the ball of the foot, beneath the big toe joint.  They act as a pulley for tendons by providing leverage when the big toe pushes off while walking, running and jumping. The sesamoids also act as a weight bearing surface for the long bone, called the first metatarsal, connected to the big toe. Although many people become affected with it due to increased activity levels, it is most common in runners and dancers because they push off the ball of their foot so much.

Frequently wearing high-heeled shoes can also be a contributing factor to Sesamoiditis – which is an overuse injury with chronic inflammation of the sesamoid bones and tendons surrounding those bones. It is possible to fracture a sesamoid bone – either acutely with a direct blow or chronically with a hairline fracture from repetitive stress.  After examining the foot and radiographic evaluation, Dr. Mendoza will help you decide the best course of action.  Sometimes oral medications such as ibuprofen will be enough to cut the pain.  Other options include steroid injections to reduce the inflammation, or even a surgical procedure to remove part or all of the affected sesamoid bone.

Click here or call our office today at 615-452-8899 to schedule your appointment with Dr. Mendoza today! 


By contactus@nashvillepodiatry.com
September 01, 2015
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Just like the big toe can develop a painful bump on the side of the toe, the little toe can too!

A tailor’s bunion, or bunionette, is an enlargement of the fifth metatarsal bone at the base of the little toe. They are not as common as bunions, but both are similar in symptoms and causes; they can be red, swollen, and painful at the site of enlargement, and can become painful when wearing shoes that rub against it. They are caused by an inherited flexible mechanical structure of the foot. The bony deformity received its name years ago when tailor sat cross-legged all day with the outside edge of their feet rubbing on the ground.

 

Similar to bunions, tailor’s bunions are progressive - they won’t just go away. Sometimes oral anti-inflammatories, icing, and/or a steroid injection may help.  Wearing wider shoes may help to reduce rubbing and irritation. In some cases, surgery is needed if other non-surgical options are not relieving the ache. 

Click here or call our office at 615-452-8899 to schedule your appointment with Dr. Mendoza today!