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By contactus@nashvillepodiatry.com
May 23, 2017
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The Achilles tendon is the band of tissue that connects the calf muscle to the heel bone.  It facilitates walking by helping to raise the heel off the ground.  As an overuse disorder, the tendonitis can be caused by a sudden increase of a repetitive activity involving the tendon. Athletes as well as "weekend warriors" are at a high risk for developing disorders of the Achilles.  Additionally, people with excessively high arches or flat feet have a tendency to develop Achilles tendonitis due to the greater demands placed on the tendon when walking – especially if they wear shoes without adequate stability. 

Dr. Mendoza and Dr. Wakefield can determine the extent of the condition with x-rays, ultrasound, or an MRI, and will develop the best treatment plan for you based on the degree of damage to the tendon.  Surgical repair is only necessary when the tendon has ruptured, but is a last resort when an injection, immobilization, icing, oral anti-inflammatory medications, and physical therapy fail to be effective.

Click here or call our office at 615-452-8899 to schedule your appointment with Nashville Podiatry today!

By contactus@nashvillepodiatry.com
May 04, 2017
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There are two main ways that diabetes can contribute to foot problems: It can cause peripheral neuropathy (tingling, burning, and decreased feeling in the feet) so that injuries and cuts may go unnoticed. It can also affect circulation to the feet, resulting in a reduced blood supply that may be inadequate to heal wounds and fight infection. For these reasons it is essential that diabetics take good care of their feet. All diabetics should follow these guidelines to avoid serious infection and potential surgery:

  • Check over your feet and in between your toes each and everyday. Look for corns and calluses that could ulcerate, as well as any redness and swelling. Inspect your feet for signs of broken skin, cuts, blisters, or scratches.

  • Wash your feet everyday in warm water (temperature tested with your hand first) with a mild soap (but don't soak your feet – it can make your skin dry out and crack).

  • Wear shoes that fit properly to prevent rubbing and ulceration, and be very careful after you start wearing new shoes – check for red spots and any signs of irritation.

  • Never go barefoot.

  • Trim your toenails carefully, or have Nashville Podiatry trim them for you if it is hard for you to do yourself – especially if you tend to draw blood while trimming them, we don't want you to start a wound that's hard to heal.

  • Never use medicated callous remover pads, leave the callous trimming to Dr. Mendoza or Dr. Wakefield!

  • Don't smoke – smoking narrows the blood vessels and decreases circulation to the feet which is particularly dangerous for people with diabetes.

  • Before you put them on, examine the inside of your shoes for foreign objects or torn linings that may cause irritation.

If you would like a diabetic foot exam or need diabetic foot care click here or call our office at 615-452-8899 today to schedule your appointment!

By contactus@nashvillepodiatry.com
April 27, 2017
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Do you have stubborn warts on the sole of your feet that won't go away with any over-the-counter products?

Warts that appear on the sole of the foot are called plantar warts, and are caused by a virus that can invade the skin through small and sometimes invisible cuts and abrasions.  The virus thrives in warm, moist environments – making infection a common occurrence in communal locker rooms and pools. If left untreated, they can grow in circumference and can spread into clusters of several warts.

Although most warts are harmless, some can be painful depending on their location. Warts on the bottom of the foot can be more difficult to treat because many topical preparations are unable to penetrate the thick skin of the foot. Dr. Mendoza and Dr. Wakefield can remove the warts by a simple surgical procedure that is performed in the office under local anesthesia. Don't put up with your plantar warts any longer, schedule your appointment today by clicking here or calling our office at 615-452-8899!

By contactus@nashvillepodiatry.com
April 18, 2017
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Pre-dislocation syndrome of the second digit, also known as "crossover toe", is a condition in which the second toe drifts toward the big toe and eventually crosses over and lies on top of the big toe. It is a progressive disorder that can begin at any age, but is most often seen in adults.

Although the crossing over of the toe usually occurs over a period of time, it can appear more quickly if caused by injury. Symptoms include: pain in the ball of the foot, or feeling like there is a marble in the shoe or a sock is bunched up. There can be swelling at the base of the second toe, and some may have difficulty wearing certain shoes.

 

Crossover toe is a result of abnormal foot mechanics, where the ball of the foot beneath the second toe joint takes an excessive amount of weight-bearing. This pressure eventually leads to weakening of the supportive ligaments and a failure of the joint to stabilize the toe, resulting in the toe crossing over. Certain foot abnormalities can make a person prone to experiencing excessive pressure on the ball of the foot, including: a severe bunion deformity, a second toe longer than the big toe, and an arch that is structurally unstable.

This condition is sometimes misdiagnosed, especially in the early stages when there is pain but the toe has not yet crossed over. The pain experienced mimics a Morton's neuroma, but the two disorders are treated very differently – making it crucial to obtain an accurate diagnosis. Rest, ice, and oral anti-inflammatories may help relieve pain and inflammation. Immobilization, taping, or splinting may be necessary to prevent further drifting of the toe. Custom orthotics help stabilize the arch, and adding a metatarsal pad helps distribute the weight away from the joint. Surgical correction is an option if the deformity becomes severe and conservative treatments are not working.

Click here or call Nashville Podiatry at 615-452-8899 to schedule your appointment today!

By contactus@nashvillepodiatry.com
April 07, 2017
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Have you been experiencing pain, numbness, or tingling in the ball of your foot? Have you had the feeling that your sock is bunched up inside your shoe? Or have you even felt a clicking towards your toes?  You may have a Morton's Neuroma.

A Morton's Neuroma is the thickening of the nerve between the third and fourth metatarsals.  It is caused by compression (such as wearing shoes with a tapered toe box) and irritation of the nerve.  This causes the nerve to swell and become irritated.  People with certain foot deformities, such as bunions and hammertoes, are at a higher risk for developing neuromas due to the pressure at the ball of the foot.

Icing, anti-inflammatories, and steroid injections are commonly used to avoid surgically removing the enlarged nerve when possible.  Dr. Mendoza or Dr. Wakefield will work with you to develop the best treatment option for your neuroma. Click here or call our office at 615-452-8899 to schedule your appointment today!





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